About Taking LSD Two Days in a Row

It’s absolutely normal to worry about addiction if you plan or happen to take drugs for a longer period of time. After all, regularly smoking or drinking leads to it. But what happens if you take LSD two days in a row?

 

If you take LSD two days in a row, you may find that the psychedelic visuals on the second day are not as intense as they were on the first day. It does not mean the LSD is less potent, just yet. It’s just that you’re still “fresh” from the previous trip. However, you may also experience more negative effects, such as nausea and extreme fatigue. But that too can be attributed to the strain on the body and mind, rather than the LSD use itself.

 

When Can You Start Building LSD Tolerance?

When taken repeatedly, LSD tolerance can develop, which means that higher doses are required to achieve the same effects. While tolerance typically leads to less pleasant experiences, some acid users enjoy the challenge of pushing their boundaries and increasing their dosage. 
There is no definite answer as to when LSD tolerance starts to develop, as it varies from person to person. However, most users report that tolerance begins to build after a few days of taking the same dose, or after a few weeks of microdosing. So if you take LSD two days in a row, you probably haven’t yet developed any tolerance.
Once tolerance has developed, it is important to be cautious when increasing the dose, as there is a risk of negative side effects such as anxiety and paranoia. It’s also worth mentioning that usually, once you stop using the substance for a few days, or months, the LSD tolerance drops down to square one.

The Bottom Line

All in all, what happens if you take LSD 2 days in a row? To be honest, except for some possible, minor discomfort, and a weaker psychedelic experience, nothing much. Lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) is not addictive, so taking acid two days in a row is relatively safe. However, if you’re worried you’ve developed tolerance, you may need to look out for LSD withdrawal symptoms. These include: anxiety, mild tremors, elevated body temperature. Rarely, users also experience milder signs of depression, and insomnia. 

LSD: The Truth About Acid


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